IT-life Dublin
Over the past couple of years,
Irish IT-companies have become more competitive than ever. The increase in the permanent recruitment of programmers and the emergence of multinational jobs are indicative trends in Ireland.

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Many people in Dublin have to rent an apartment. The real estate rental market is always overheated, a very small apartment in the center costs from €700. Most IT-specialists with their families rent two-bedroom apartments for €1,300 and more. Now, they say, you won't find anything decent for less than €1500. Anything that is listed cheaper attracts a crowd of potential tenants, sometimes more than 10 people per view. At the same time, prices continue to grow steadily from year to year.

Rent is very expensive in the capital. This is due to the 2008 crisis. The construction then froze. People were unable to pay off loans (and all young people live on credit), banks went bankrupt, construction organizations collapsed. The sector had just started to wake up. But demand still significantly exceeds supply. On average, for a house (a two-story townhouse, in Dublin many live in such) you need to pay € 1400 per month. You will get three small bedrooms, a living room, a kitchen, your own patio - and this is not the most prestigious area. In general, it's expensive. Even for the IT-specialist. In Ireland, it is customary to live like this: you give a third of your earnings to housing, another third to related expenses, and the rest goes to travel and savings.

And some more expenses. € 1,500 per year - the so-called management fee - community fees of the owners' association. This includes site maintenance, garbage collection, home insurance. In townhouses, sometimes there is no such fee, in which case all these costs are paid individually.
The cost of housing is about € 200 thousand. 10% is the first installment, € 5 thousand was spent on taxes and commissions for operations, and the remaining amount was given on credit at 4% for 35 years. It cost € 750 a month. That is, an Irishman with an average salary spends about a tenth of his monthly income on housing and communal services. And in summer, without heating, it is about € 100. Communal payments here does not hit the wallet hard. But there is a nuance: this is also the case because the Irish are used to living in the cold. They are cool in summer, and in winter they do not heat much - 18, maximum 20 degrees indoors.

Electricity bills come every 2 months, ranging from €150 to €300. The cheapest wired internet is €45. Until 2015, water was free, then it became about €150 per person per year. There were massive protests in this regard, but the tariffs were not canceled. Those who have gas boilers are paid another €100-200 per month.

The price of housing also includes an underground parking space. There is parking in the adjacent territory. In residential areas, there are no problems with this, since the population density is low due to low-level buildings.

Nearby there are townhouses, and more multy-appartment building, there are also individual houses. That is, the development is diverse, for different needs and prosperity. Nearby are several golf courses, a shopping center, and convenient transport to the city center - the Luas tram, which means speed in Irish.

Interests on mortgages are low - 3-4%. A decent two-room apartment or adjacent house within the city will cost from 200 thousand euros. Now it has already come to the point that those who want to buy housing line up right on the street.

Transport, by the way, is expensive and at the same time not of impressive quality:


  • DART (city train). There is only one line that runs along the coast through the capital and the suburbs. The average trip will cost about €4.
  • Luas (tram). The journey costs about €2, there are only two lines, one of which is quite trashy.
  • Dublin bus (double-decker buses). The good thing about it: free wi-fi, front seats on the second floor with great views, and excellent city coverage. From the rest: you need to pay for travel with a change or a card, receive change by checks. If you pay with a card, you need to tell the driver your stop so that the correct amount is withdrawn from the card. However, drivers often do not know the names of stops on the route. In addition, the movement occurs with deviations from the schedule.
  • Taxi. The road from the airport to the southern part of Dublin city center costs about €25. There is a surcharge for each additional passenger.
  • Intercity trains are quite comfortable, but expensive, about €70 from one end of the country to the other (3 hours drive).
  • DublinBikes. A network of city bike stations throughout central Dublin. Convenient and cheap (€20 per year), many people use it.
Transport, by the way, is expensive and at the same time not of impressive quality:

  • DART (city train). There is only one line that runs along the coast through the capital and the suburbs. The average trip will cost about €4.
  • Luas (tram). The journey costs about €2, there are only two lines, one of which is quite trashy.
  • Dublin bus (double-decker buses). The good thing about it: free wi-fi, front seats on the second floor with great views, and excellent city coverage. From the rest: you need to pay for travel with a change or a card, receive change by checks. If you pay with a card, you need to tell the driver your stop so that the correct amount is withdrawn from the card. However, drivers often do not know the names of stops on the route. In addition, the movement occurs with deviations from the schedule.
  • Taxi. The road from the airport to the southern part of Dublin city center costs about €25. There is a surcharge for each additional passenger.
  • Intercity trains are quite comfortable, but expensive, about €70 from one end of the country to the other (3 hours drive).
  • DublinBikes. A network of city bike stations throughout central Dublin. Convenient and cheap (€20 per year), many people use it.

IT-industry in Dublin

As it turned out, Ireland is the largest European IT center. Here are the European offices of the world's largest IT companies, and those that are smaller can not be counted.
The Irish government has set a goal for itself - to organize a global hub of technology companies on the island, and so far they have succeeded. They managed to attract representative offices and development centers of the world's largest IT market players to Ireland. For now, Ireland has:
  • 10 of the world's top 10 technology companies;

3 of the top 3 enterprise software companies;

9 of the top 10 world software companies;

3 of the top 5 game development companies;

3 of the top 3 enterprise software companies;

Top 10 Companies Born on the Internet.

Here are the names of just a few of them:

Microsoft, Amazon, Google, Oracle, Dell, Apple, SanDicsk, Kingston, Facebook, Intel, HP, Eircom, EMC, IBM, Red Hat, Ericsson, Bentley Software, Siemens, Twitter, Linkedin, Yahoo !, Cisco, Dropbox, Electronic Arts, Alcatel, AOL.
Over the past 5 years, the number of people with IT contract jobs in Dublin has increased by 43%. In 2014, this segment employed 74,000 people, and in 2019 already 105,000, which is more than 2% of the total population of Ireland.
Naturally, such rapid growth of entry level IT jobs in Dublin cannot be provided only by the country's internal resources. Companies are actively bringing specialists from different parts of the world, which is why the national composition of the country is changing. People from Germany, Italy, Poland, Ukraine, Albania, India, USA, Russia, China, Australia, Pakistan can work side by side in the office ... it can be a long list.
To understand the scope and importance of the ICT segment (Information, Communications & Technology), it is enough to know that it accounts for 40% of the total export volume of Ireland.
To attract and retain technology companies, the government has announced several support programs. Startups can receive various grants from the state, for example, a development grant of 10 million euros. In addition, all existing companies can enjoy benefits in the form of a reduced tax rate and information support: consultations, mentoring, seminars.
The ICT sector is one of the highest priorities for the state in the long term, which means that there will be more companies and more specialists will be needed.

Work, salaries, and expenses

The British Higher School of Art and Design (BHSAD) is a partner of the University of Hertfordshire (UH) running six validated BA (Hons) programmes. Upon successful completion of studies BHSAD students

are eligible to receive academic awards issued by the University of Hertfordshire and identical

to those provided for UH graduates. Our students can transfer freely to UH and return back

for any semester during their studies.

Senior Software Engineer
Senior Software Engineer
70K per year ~ €3800 per month
Senior Automation QA
Senior Automation QA
60K per year~ €3450 per month
Senior Manual QA
Senior Manual QA
55K per year~ €3250 per month
On average, the senior IT manager jobs in Dublin are paid € 70 thousand per year before taxes - it turns out somewhere around € 50 thousand after deduction, that is, about € 4000 per hand per month. Yes, probably more than in other countries, but not dramatically.

For entry level IT jobs in Dublin € 4,000 is good money, it is twice as high as the average salary in the country. The minimum wage here is quite high (€ 9.15 per hour), but you can't really live on it. Yes, Ireland is developing, the "Celtic Tiger" has made its leap, but unemployment still exceeds 10%. In general, there are nuances.

Specialists confirm what we have heard many times: the specifics of working in IT have long depended not on a country, but on a specific company. Yes, there are Google and Facebook, but for most IT-pros getting there is not an end in itself. Quite the contrary, they prefer medium-sized firms, in which it is easier to prove themselves. A specialist who worked at Google put it quite interestingly: this is a company for "children". Everything is arranged so that you stay there as much time as possible - eat, drink, sleep, play with their toys. It is good for young people, but when there is a family, this is different. In general, everything is decided not by the sign, but by how much you are paid.

To complete the topic of money: an abstract senior developer after rent (€ 1200-1500), communal costs (€ 200-400), mobile communications, food, and transport will have about € 1500.

What is needed from the IT-specialists

A specialist with a combination of IT knowledge and foreign languages ​​will have

a great advantage in the IT project manager jobs in Dublin and Irish labor market

in general. Such a mixture will also appeal to global players such as Dell, Apple, and EMC, which have built global support centers in Cork. The pressure on companies will cause the need to acquire resources for the UX sphere and web services, as well as the need to adapt new technologies and programming languages ​​(for example, Scala, Ruby, Groovy). "Smart" will be a key differentiator for a good candidate in Ireland as more teams adopt complementary development strategies. The best performers must be strong communicators who show a tendency towards continuous growth and self-improvement.

Rest, prices, everyday life

A specialist with a combination of IT knowledge and foreign languages ​​will have

a great advantage in the IT project manager jobs in Dublin and Irish labor market

At 5-6 o'clock, the Irish finish their work, go to restaurants for supper, from 9 o'clock they move to pubs in order to move to nightclubs by 12. Excellent life cycle! True, all this is only on a local patch in the center.


There are many steep beaches in the vicinity of Dublin. The promenade, bars on the shore, seagulls chatting, sitting on the parapet ... But the same story happened to the Irish resorts as to the British ones. When the cost of low-cost flights to Spain and Portugal became comparable to the fare in a Dublin taxi, the beaches were empty.

Prices in Ireland are hardly low. The price level directly depends on the city. The highest prices are in Dublin and the city of Cork.


Clothes and footwear in this country are also quite expensive. You can buy jeans from €75 to €90, while sneakers or shoes cost between €80 and €90.


But such high prices are not limited to food and clothing. Even foreigners are impressed by the prices of household chemicals. So, on average, a tube of toothpaste costs about €4, and washing powder can be bought for €5-6 per pack. Based on the above prices, life in Ireland is not cheap. On average, a tourist for one day of residence in this country will need from €100 to €120. Tourists are advised to eat in cafes, as prices in supermarkets and cafes are identical. On average, a meal per person will cost €12-14.


There are good promotions: for example, when buying for € 50 you get a discount of € 10 on your next purchase, when buying for € 100 - € 20. On average, a month people spend about € 400 for food for two (this includes a couple of bottles of French wine for the weekend, and alcohol is not cheap here).

The Republic of Ireland is ranked among the 5 most developed countries in terms of living standards. There are excellent job and career prospects in the IT-sphere. This country is home to global companies that annually recruit new employees. The indigenous citizens of this country are very tolerant and friendly towards foreigners, so in the case of immigration to Ireland, you do not have to worry about discrimination. Living in this country, there is an opportunity to admire the unusually beautiful nature and amazing architecture.
Working hours:
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GMT+3
Saturday and Sunday: day off
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